THE NATURE OF THE EKKLESIA – ISSUES OF DIVERSITY & LUKEWARMNESS IN THE BODY OF CHRIST.

Updated: Mar 29


Recently, Francis Chan, whose ministry many of us admire, spoke of the nature of those who assemble under the banner of Christ, as the Body of Christ. Francis, as we here at One Body Life, desires that there be true unity in the Body of Christ—in fulfillment of our Lord’s prayer in John 17—“That they all may be one – perfected into one” as the Father and Son are one in eternal fellowship—even so we are brought into that same fellowship of oneness when we are born from above . . . both of us, and all believers in Jesus, should desire this fellowship!

Notwithstanding, believers in the Savior proliferate with division. Yet, Jesus prayed that His unity/oneness would be a reality among us all . . . so, where do we stand in this confliction when, on the one hand, we’re all supposed to be ONE in His fellowship—yet, on the other hand, division and divisiveness persists among believers in Jesus? Francis Chan interprets 1 Corinthians 11:18-19 when Paul speaks of divisions among the Corinthian believers with the following commentary (periodic insertions by OBL are added to clarify statements):

FRANCIS CHAN [Transcribed from his video as seen @ CRAZY LOVE MINISTRIES ]:

“One of the chapters in the book [one of Francis Chan’s latest publications] was the fellowship of the lukewarm – here’s what Paul says to the Corinthians [1 Cor. 11:18-19], he [Paul] goes, ‘yeah, I hear there’s divisions among you and in part I believe it; in fact, divisions must exist so that those who are sincere can be separated’ . . . you know there is going to be a division but the only way we’re going to have perfect unity is when we divide from those who are not sincere; from those who are lukewarm; who are not really saved. The problem is we’re trying to become one with people who have not really surrendered their lives to Jesus.

“It’s not about denominations. It’s not about these technical points of theology. It’s about in your heart you have not surrendered to God. You don’t see the beauty of the cross. You’re not like Zacchaeus where you’re just ready to give up everything because God is so in your life that when Zacchaeuses meet with one another they can become one; but when Zacchaeus and the rich young ruler try to have fellowship it doesn’t work out.

“So, you get a bunch of missionaries, you know, who’ve had their arms chopped off for whatever [reason]—you put them in a room and there will be unity . . . but you throw in some kook, skinny jean guy, you know, ‘hey, Jesus is your buddy’ . . . it’s going to be, like, real fellowship to take place suddenly?

“But there is, I think, this desire in those of us who are believers . . . we want to be one. It doesn’t make sense to us – there’s no way on earth that God is looking at all these factions and going: ‘Yes, that is exactly what I wanted. That’s what I dreamt of when I was on the cross.’ We know that’s not what He wanted. And we desire . . . we don’t like division; we hate division. Those of us who really know him . . . why? Because the Spirit hates division.

“This is why we grieve the Spirit. We can literally grieve God (Eph. 4:30) by our divisiveness and by the way we treat one another. So, then, for those of us who have the Spirit—when we see the division—it grieves us because the Spirit is in us. And, so, I’m going: ‘Gosh, it actually shouldn’t be that hard. It’s those who really have the Spirit of God in them—you’re going to want this, and we’re going to pursue this.

“The issue is to be willing to let go of those who divide the church . . . the Bible commands us to ignore them . . . to warn them . . . and to have nothing to do with them. And, so, we have to let go of those people (biblically) and move on with those who want this oneness.

“It’s got me more and more excited and I think, maybe that’s why I’m back [in the USA from Hong Kong] and I’m supposed to do something like that for awhile and bring people together and get back to just really praising God deeply with brothers and sisters . . . then showing a unity that the world doesn’t have right now. Because I think, you know, the world was more unified (I’m talking about America) – Americans were more unified than the Christians were. You know, they rallied around the same causes. And now, the country is pretty divided for the first time in my lifetime. Have I seen this much division to this extreme? I say, ‘Wow, maybe this is the time the church comes together, and we can be a light in the darkness.’

“But it’s just fun having that childlike faith again. And, ‘God, if You sent Jesus to the cross to bring peace between us and You, then You’ll do something to bring us all together, Your children, because you hate this and I’m going to keep praying for this and believing in this and saying and doing whatever I can. But now it’s not like I’m just going to do my little part and it’s not going to work anyway. It’s a different attitude. It’s like, ‘No, this could happen in my lifetime.’ I’m believing for it; I’m shooting for it. Excited about it."

ONE BODY LIFE’S RESPONSE (Do bear with us in this rather lengthy treatise.)

We are responding to our brother’s sincere, but somewhat mixed interpretation of 1 Corinthians 11:18-19. Yes, we here at OBL are just as concerned and grieved by the divisions in the Body of Christ by those who provoke a spirit of division with their factious behavior. However, we must address the very nature of the oneness of expression articulated by our beloved brother with the intent that he, as we all, would come to grips with the expression of our gathering together under the headship of Christ as it relates to 1 Corinthians 11:18-19:


For first, while you are coming-together in church[a], I am hearing that there are divisions among you. And a certain part of it I believe— 19 for there indeed have-to[b] be factions among you in order that the approved ones may also[c] become known among you. (1 Cor. 11:18-19 – Disciples Literal NT) – a. 1 Corinthians 11:18 Or, an assembly. That is, in home meetings. b. 1 Corinthians 11:19 Or, must. (1 Cor. 11:18-19)

Separating out those lukewarm, insincere brethren – those factions – out from the assembly of brethren because they may not even be saved and that they inhibit, even mitigate, the expression of the Oneness of the Body of Christ may seem like we are “purging out the leaven that leavens the whole lump” . . . in other words, Chan says that such “factions” are NOT in the mind of Christ when we assemble and that these brethren (who may be considered insincere or even unsaved) should be extracted from our fellowship. Francis reinforces his commentary by alluding to Romans 16:17-18, to wit:


“I urge you, brothers and sisters, to watch out for those who cause divisions and put obstacles in your way that are contrary to the teaching you have learned. Keep away from them (or “avoid them”). For such people are not serving our Lord Christ, but their own appetites. By smooth talk and flattery, they deceive the minds of naïve people.”

Unfortunately, by conflating 1 Corinthians 1:18-19 with Romans 16:17-18 our brother has inadvertently done an injustice to the intent of Paul’s remarks in 1 Corinthians 1:18-19 in that Paul clearly states that such “factions” are necessary in our assemblies (Paul is not suggesting we expunge them from the assembly)—“factions” are anticipated and they “must” appear . . . not, as brother Francis claims—should be separated out from our fellowship. Why? These factions are there so that those who are approved of God, are genuine, are mature in the Lord, should be manifested to keep, no doubt, the “unity of the Spirit in the uniting bond of peace” (Eph. 4:3). Yes, we all want a pristine expression of the ekklesia—but such a pure expression is NOT happening by purging out or separating from Laodicean-style believers (viz., those lukewarm).


Again, such an exclusion from fellowship at our assembling would open the door by creating spiritually superior cliques unto themselves—keeping those less spiritual from our gatherings. By keeping those less spiritual from our gatherings can readily result in cliques. Our conviction is this: When Paul said that the believers in Corinth were carnal because they clung to certain apostles like Apollos, Cephas, Paul and some claimed “I am of Christ”—they were all carnal. The “I am of Christ” group readily could be viewed as the spiritually purified clique! Whereas Paul continues to clarify the nature of the assembly and those who might “show up” among us in this manner:


“When you come together, each of you has . . . For you can all prophesy in turn so that everyone may be instructed and encouraged . . . So, if the whole ekklesia comes together and everyone speaks in tongues, and inquirers [aka, the “unlearned”] or unbelievers come in, will they not say that you are out of your mind? But if an unbeliever or an inquirer (“unlearned”) comes in while everyone is prophesying, they are convicted of sin and are brought under judgment by all, as the secrets of their hearts are laid bare. So they will fall down and worship God, exclaiming, ‘God is really among you!’” (1 Cor. 14 excerpts – NIV).

Indeed, it is mandatory that such factions come together – be they Baptists, Pentecostals or “Dones” – even unbelievers or inquirers - or whatever their label – DIVERSITY is the norm in the Body of Christ—that’s why we have Romans 9-16 – and that’s why we have 1 Corinthians 11-14 wherein “each one has” . . . and “one by one” is done “decently and in order.” We are and can be of “one mind and one spirit” but that does not mean we are a homogeneous section of the orchestra but we are in agreement as in a symphony with all gifts, parts, and members of the same Body in harmony when we’re all playing in unison.

If we separate out those who are “less spiritual” than ourselves (aka, “lukewarm”) then the five ekklesia Jesus reprimanded in Revelation 2-3 would be excluded; it would be unnecessary to exhort them to faith and to inspire them to repent—“. . . they are convicted of sin and are brought under judgment by all, as the secrets of their hearts are laid bare.” How can that happen if such “factions” are not present? If such “factions” are excluded—there will be little conviction of the aforementioned to repent of their divisive sins!


The translation of the word to “heresies” is a contextual bias on the part of translators. Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the NT suggest a variety of meanings:


“. . . that which is chosen, a chosen course of thought and action; hence one’s chosen opinion, tenet . . . a body of men separating themselves from others and following their own tenets [a sect or party]: as the Sadducees, Acts v. 17; the Pharisees, Acts xv. 5; xxvi. 5; the Christians, Acts xxiv. 5, 14 . . . dissensions arising from diversity of opinions and aims: Gal. v. 20; 1 Co. xi. 19.[1]


The general sense of the word used here in 1 Corinthians 11:19 is not that of aberrant teachings antithetical to the “faith once delivered” but of a “diversity of opinions and aims” (i.e., beliefs/doctrines and aims/practices/styles) creating factions in the assembly which can become divisive.

[1] Thayer’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament – Coded with Strong’s Concordance Numbers, by Joseph H. Thayer, Hendrickson Publishers, Peabody, Mass., Fourteenth Printing—June 2019, 139, p. 16.

Listen, over the course of many centuries believers have sought to “come out from among them and be separate” – the unfortunate consequence of their actions with other members of the same Body is to proliferate countless sects of superiority claiming they are the true expression of the Body of Christ where Christ is lifted up and all else is Babylon the Great! So, you may charge us with: “Well then, we should all have stayed in the Roman Catholic Church!” No, quite the opposite—the Roman Catholic Church did NOT tolerate diversity; and, tragically (as Protestants later did) persecuted other believers who were different.